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Rosie The Riveter Memorial Garden To Honor Women Of WWII Era
Updated March 19, 2018 6:04 AM
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Angie Timan-Morthland as Rosie the Riveter
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Women keeping the homefront during WWII at Naval Ammunition Depot Crane. Courtesy photo.
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Rosie the Riveter Garden Site - Courtesy photo
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Rosie the Riveter poster, courtesy photo

(BEDFORD) - A Rosie the Riveter Memorial Garden will honor women of World War II era.

The garden will be dedicated during a ceremony March 21 at 3:30 p.m. The Rosie the Riveter Rally will last till 4:00 p.m. The garden will be located near the gazebo at Thornton Park.

The garden is the creation of the Bedford Parks Department and the Lawrence County Rosie the Riveter Association Chapter.

Angie Timan, who is Lawrence County's Rosie the Riveter is looking for sponsors for a sign for the garden, which cost $50 and rosebushes which cost $25 each. Those that purchase a rosebush can dedicate them to a family member who serviced on the homefront during World War II.

As a WWII Naval Ammunition Depot Crane Army Ammunition Activity says women were essential in ensuring Crane delivers quality munitions to the Warfighter.

American women played important roles during World War II, both at home and in uniform. Not only did they give their sons, husbands, fathers, and brothers to the war effort, they gave their time, energy, and some even gave their lives.

Reluctant to enter the war when it erupted in 1939, the United States quickly committed itself to total war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. That commitment included utilizing all of America's assets - women included.

As the men fought abroad, women on the Home Front worked in defense plants and volunteered for war-related organizations, in addition to managing their households.

Rosie the Riveter helped assure that the Allies would have the war materials they needed to defeat the Axis.

Nearly 350,000 American women served in uniform, both at home and abroad, volunteering for the newly formed Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAACs, later renamed the Women's Army Corps), the Navy Women's Reserve (WAVES), the Marine Corps Women's Reserve, the Coast Guard Women's Reserve (SPARS), the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS), the Army Nurses Corps, and the Navy Nurse Corps.

General Eisenhower felt that he could not win the war without the aid of the women in uniform. "The contribution of the women of America, whether on the farm or in the factory or in uniform, to D-Day was a sine qua non of the invasion effort." (Ambrose, D-Day, 489)

Nearly 350,000 American women served in uniform, both at home and abroad, volunteering for the newly formed Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAACs, later renamed the Women's Army Corps), the Navy Women's Reserve (WAVES), the Marine Corps Women's Reserve, the Coast Guard Women's Reserve (SPARS), the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS), the Army Nurses Corps, and the Navy Nurse Corps. General Eisenhower felt that he could not win the war without the aid of the women in uniform. "The contribution of the women of America, whether on the farm or in the factory or in uniform, to D-Day was a sine qua non of the invasion effort." (Ambrose, D-Day, 489)



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