News Sections
Audio
Clearview Baptist Church To Host Event About Human Trafficking
Updated November 11, 2015 12:01 PM | Filed under: Event
 Print    Archive    RSS
trafficking.jpg

(BEDFORD) - Clearview Baptist Church will host Nadine Hill, the founder and executive Director of Ecumeniacl Women's Coaltition Against Human Trafficking.

Hill says, human trafficking is the fastest growing crime in the world surpassing the drug trade. It is easier to traffic a human being than to sell drugs on the streets. It is a $150 billion worldwide industry and is growing every day.

There is not a place in Indiana that is immune to traffickers.

"The event is not a scare tactic - it is an effort to make as many people aware as possible," Hill wrote in a press release.

Since founding the organization in February 2012, Hill has travelled nearly 5,000 miles and given over 300 awareness and educational presentations in five states.

The program is free to attend and will be held on Friday, Nov. 20 from 6:30 p.m. till 8:30 p.m. at Clearview Baptist Church at 1401 22nd Street.

Those attending will learn about human trafficking, ways that you can help curb this horrid crime, find out about training and educational seminars for children, teachers, medical personnel, security and police.

There will also be items made by women in Cambodia, who were victims of this crime. The women are selling silk scarves, pashminas, clothing, hats and other items to help defray Hills cost to present the programs and to support their families.

Little Known Facts About Human Trafficking:

  • Approximately 75-80% of human trafficking is for sex.
  • Researchers note that sex trafficking plays a major role in the spread of HIV.
  • There are more human slaves in the world today than ever before in history.
  • There are an estimated 27 million adults and 13 million children around the world who are victims of human trafficking.
  • Human trafficking not only involves sex and labor, but people are also trafficked for organ harvesting.
  • Human traffickers often use a Sudanese phrase "use a slave to catch slaves," meaning traffickers send "broken-in girls" to recruit younger girls into the sex trade. Sex traffickers often train girls themselves, raping them and teaching them sex acts.
  • An estimated 30,000 victims of sex trafficking die each year from abuse, disease, torture, and neglect. Eighty percent of those sold into sexual slavery are under 24, and some are as young as six years old.
  • Ludwig "Tarzan" Fainberg, a convicted trafficker, said, "You can buy a woman for $10,000 and make your money back in a week if she is pretty and young. Then everything else is profit."
  • A human trafficker can earn 20 times what he or she paid for a girl. Provided the girl was not physically brutalized to the point of ruining her beauty, the pimp could sell her again for a greater price because he had trained her and broken her spirit, which saves future buyers the hassle. A 2003 study in the Netherlands found that, on average, a single sex slave earned her pimp at least $250,000 a year.
  • Although human trafficking is often a hidden crime and accurate statistics are difficult to obtain, researchers estimate that more than 80% of trafficking victims are female. Over 50% of human trafficking victims are children.
  • According to a 2009 Washington Times article, the Taliban buys children as young as seven years old to act as suicide bombers. The price for child suicide bombers is between $7,000-$14,000. UNICEF estimates that 300,000 children younger than 18 are currently trafficked to serve in armed conflicts worldwide.
  • More than 30% of all trafficking cases in 2007-2008 involved children being sold into the sex industry.
  • Most human trafficking in the United States occurs in New York, California, and Florida.
  • According to United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), over the past 30 years, over 30 million children have been sexually exploited through human trafficking.
  • Belgium, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Thailand, Turkey, and the U.S. are ranked very high as destination countries of trafficked victims.
  • Sex traffickers use a variety of ways to "condition" their victims, including subjecting them to starvation, rape, gang rape, physical abuse, beating, confinement, threats of violence toward the victim and victim's family, forced drug use, and shame.
  • Family members will often sell children and other family members into slavery; the younger the victim, the more money the trafficker receives. For example, a 10-year-old named Gita was sold into a brothel by her aunt. The now 22-year-old recalls that when she refused to work, the older girls held her down and stuck a piece of cloth in her mouth so no one would hear her scream as she was raped by a customer. She would later contract HIV.
  • Human trafficking is one of the fastest growing criminal enterprises because it holds relatively low risk with high profit potential. Criminal organizations are increasingly attracted to human trafficking because, unlike drugs, humans can be sold repeatedly.
  • Human trafficking is estimated to surpass the drug trade in less than five years. Journalist Victor Malarek reports that it is primarily men who are driving human trafficking, specifically trafficking for sex.
  • In approximately 54% of human trafficking cases, the recruiter is a stranger, and in 46% of the cases, the recruiters know the victim. Fifty-two percent of human trafficking recruiters are men, 42% are women, and 6% are both men and women.
  • Human trafficking around the globe is estimated to generate a profit of anywhere from $9 billion to $31.6 billion. Half of these profits are made in industrialized countries.
  • Some human traffickers recruit handicapped young girls, such as those suffering from Down Syndrome, into the sex industry.
  • Airports are often used by human traffickers to hold "slave auctions," where women and children are sold into prostitution.
  • Today, slaves are cheaper than they have ever been in history. The population explosion has created a great supply of workers, and globalization has created people who are vulnerable and easily enslaved.
  • Sex traffickers often recruit children because not only are children more unsuspecting and vulnerable than adults, but there is also a high market demand for young victims. Traffickers target victims on the telephone, on the Internet, through friends, at the mall, and in after-school programs.
  • Human trafficking has been reported in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and in some U.S. territories.
  • The FBI estimates that over 100,000 children and young women are trafficked in America today. They range in age from nine to 19, with the average being age 11. Many victims are not just runaways or abandoned, but are from "good" families who are coerced by clever traffickers.
  • Nearly 7,000 Nepali girls as young as nine years old are sold every year into India's red-light district--or 200,000 in the last decade. Ten thousand children between the ages of six and 14 are in Sri Lanka brothels.
  • The largest human trafficking case in recent U.S. history occurred in Hawaii in 2010. Global Horizons Manpower, Inc., a labor-recruiting company, bought 400 immigrants in 2004 from Thailand to work on farms in Hawaii. They were lured with false promises of high-paying farm work, but instead their passports were taken away and they were held in forced servitude until they were rescued in 2010.


« Previous Article
Next Article »

 Print    Archive    RSS

Have a question or comment about a news story? Send it to comments@wbiw.com

Advertise with 1340 AM WBIW
Find more about Weather in Bedford, IN
Advertise with 1340 AM WBIW


1340 AM WBIW, Bedford's Place To Talk. Serving Lawrence and surrounding counties since 1948!

© 2018 Ad-Venture Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   WBIW.com and Listen Live Powered by HPC

Advertise  |  Careers  |  Contests  |  About  |  Feedback